Getting into the Rhythm – The New Indian Express

Express press service

CHENNAI: The warm sizzle that precedes the music when the stylus is placed on a vinyl record – that was once the nostalgia associated with the 60s when rock ‘n roll was all the rage. Sound, however, is now back in vogue among a new generation that grew up on iPods and Spotify. Vinyl records have exploded in popularity since the mid-2010s and our metropolises are catching up with the new craze for this somewhat antiquated way of listening to music. So how has Chennai caught up with the trend?

Listening Modes
“When you listen to music on a vinyl record, you engage with the music in a different way,” says Bipin Sukumaran, a sales professional and new convert to the vinyl craze. “Vinyl requires precise handling and constant attention, and that changes the whole experience of listening to music. It’s very different from playing music on your iPhone or Spotify, where you just press the play button and your mind is free to wander. After following the resurgence of interest in vinyl in recent years, Bipin, an inveterate music lover, invested in his first vinyl equipment last November. Since then, he has amassed nearly 75 vinyl records across all genres. “From MS Subbulakshmi to Iron Maiden, I’m open to everyone.”

Raghu Muthiah, who started collecting vinyl about five years ago, is taking a step forward in his love for all things analog. In the works is a space he is setting up in TTK Road, a cafe incorporating music played from vinyl records as well as an entertainment space that can host performances. As expected, the music will be played from Raghu’s own collection of around 250 vinyl records, although he has considered the idea of ​​letting people bring in their personal records and play them in the facility. that he puts in place.

Growing up in the 80s, Raghu admits to having a certain fondness for the sounds produced by the stereo systems of the time. “There’s a certain beauty to the way sounds were mixed back then for stereo systems, which is quite different from how they’re mixed for digital audio. It’s for this reason that I prefer records produced in the 80s and 90s to new pressings that are digitally remastered,” he says.

And it’s not mere nostalgia that’s driving vinyl’s resurgence. “Technically, vinyl sounds the best more than any other medium, but a lot depends on the equipment it’s being played on, as well as the actual quality of the record and where it was made. this is a used record, the conditions of wear should also be considered,” added Bipin. Bipin and Raghu Muthiah are one of the few enthusiastic converts in a town that has remained somewhat indifferent to the vinyl resurgence Raghunath, who sells high-end audio equipment at his Decibel store in Alwarpet, confirms: “It’s a niche market. Although there has been some shift in consumer demographics, it’s not is not as pronounced as what you would see in Europe or the United States.

Cost factors
The biggest stumbling block for anyone curious about getting into vinyl is the price factor. To get decent quality sound, a vinyl enthusiast should invest in a range of equipment – ​​a record player, an amplifier with a phono input and some speakers. Although some modern players come with built-in phono preamps, experts say a dedicated phono input still delivers better sound quality. Then there is the daunting task of collecting records. A used vinyl record in good condition can cost upwards of £1,000, and the price multiplies if a record is in pristine condition and rare to find. “So most of the people who take vinyl as a serious hobby are people with enough disposable income, so our customer base is largely in the 40+ age group” , mentions Raghunath.

Music labels around the world have responded to the worldwide resurgence of vinyl culture by re-releasing new pressings of popular albums. But vinyl connoisseurs aren’t convinced. “It may not be obvious to the untrained ear, but vinyl produced when sound mixing was analog is vastly different in quality from the latest digitally remastered editions. Such a process involves converting analog sound to digital and then back to analog, which not only results in a loss of information, but also defeats the purpose of listening to vinyl, which is to experience analog sound,” adds Raghunath.

The expense of getting into vinyl might make it look more like a first world indulgence, but luckily there are entry-level turntables out there that offer decent sound quality and can be installed for the price of a system. home theater. For a generation used to listening to music on iTunes and Spotify, vinyl might take some getting used to, but it’s still worth it, says Raghu Muthiah. “The only requirement is to invest in good equipment, pick up some nice records, and you’re good to go.”

CHENNAI: The warm sizzle that precedes the music when the stylus is placed on a vinyl record – that was once the nostalgia associated with the 60s when rock ‘n roll was all the rage. Sound, however, is now back in vogue among a new generation that grew up on iPods and Spotify. Vinyl records have exploded in popularity since the mid-2010s and our metropolises are catching up with the new craze for this somewhat antiquated way of listening to music. So how has Chennai caught up with the trend? Listening Modes “When you play music on a vinyl record, you engage with the music in a different way,” says Bipin Sukumaran, a sales professional and new convert to the vinyl craze. “Vinyl requires precise handling and constant attention, and that changes the whole experience of listening to music. It’s very different from playing music on your iPhone or Spotify, where you just press the play button and your mind is free to wander. After following the resurgence of interest in vinyl in recent years, Bipin, an inveterate music lover, invested in his first vinyl equipment last November. Since then, he has amassed nearly 75 vinyl records across all genres. “From MS Subbulakshmi to Iron Maiden, I’m open to everyone.” Raghu Muthiah, who started collecting vinyl about five years ago, is taking a step forward in his love for all things analog. In the works is a space he is setting up in TTK Road, a cafe incorporating music played from vinyl records as well as an entertainment space that can host performances. As expected, the music will be played from Raghu’s own collection of around 250 vinyl records, although he has considered the idea of ​​letting people bring in their personal records and play them in the facility. that he puts in place. Growing up in the 80s, Raghu admits to having a certain fondness for the sounds produced by the stereo systems of the time. “There’s a certain beauty to the way sounds were mixed back then for stereo systems, which is quite different from how they’re mixed for digital audio. It’s for this reason that I prefer records produced in the 80s and 90s to new pressings that are digitally remastered,” he says. And it’s not mere nostalgia that’s driving vinyl’s resurgence. “Technically, vinyl sounds the best more than any other medium, but a lot depends on the equipment it’s being played on, as well as the actual quality of the record and where it was made. this is a used record, the conditions of wear should also be considered,” added Bipin. Bipin and Raghu Muthiah are one of the few enthusiastic converts in a town that has remained somewhat indifferent to the vinyl resurgence Raghunath, who sells high-end audio equipment at his Decibel store in Alwarpet, confirms: “It’s a niche market. Although there has been some shift in consumer demographics, it’s not It’s not as pronounced as you’d see in Europe or the US Cost Factors The biggest stumbling block for anyone curious about getting into vinyl is the price factor. decent, a vinyl enthusiast should invest in a range equipment – a record player, an amplifier with a phono input and some speakers. Although some modern players come with built-in phono preamps, experts say a dedicated phono input still delivers better sound quality. Then there is the daunting task of collecting records. A used vinyl record in good condition can cost upwards of £1,000, and the price multiplies if a record is in pristine condition and rare to find. “So most of the people who take vinyl as a serious hobby are people with enough disposable income, so our customer base is largely in the 40+ age group” , mentions Raghunath. Music labels around the world have responded to the worldwide resurgence of vinyl culture by re-releasing new pressings of popular albums. But vinyl connoisseurs aren’t convinced. “It may not be obvious to the untrained ear, but vinyl produced when sound mixing was analog is vastly different in quality from the latest digitally remastered editions. Such a process involves converting analog sound to digital and then back to analog, which not only results in a loss of information, but also defeats the purpose of listening to vinyl, which is to experience analog sound,” adds Raghunath. The expense of getting into vinyl might make it look more like a first world indulgence, but luckily there are entry-level turntables out there that offer decent sound quality and can be installed for the price of a system. home theater. For a generation used to listening to music on iTunes and Spotify, vinyl might take some getting used to, but it’s still worth it, says Raghu Muthiah. “The only requirement is to invest in good equipment, pick up some nice records, and you’re good to go.”

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