Music Market – MP3ar http://mp3ar.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:41:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mp3ar.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Music Market – MP3ar http://mp3ar.com/ 32 32 Francophone African musicians watch the global market through streaming https://mp3ar.com/francophone-african-musicians-watch-the-global-market-through-streaming/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:41:08 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/francophone-african-musicians-watch-the-global-market-through-streaming/ Rising star: Ivorian rapper Didi B Sia KAMBOU Text size The skyrocketing popularity of streaming platforms has lifted artists from Nigeria and others from English-speaking Africa to unprecedented popularity around the world. Musicians from French-speaking countries on the continent are now looking to take advantage of the boom. The leader in streaming in Africa is […]]]>

Rising star: Ivorian rapper Didi B

Sia KAMBOU

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The Secret to Music Industry Networking https://mp3ar.com/the-secret-to-music-industry-networking/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 08:38:38 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/the-secret-to-music-industry-networking/ Building a network by making lasting connections lost is the backbone of the music industry. Here are some helpful tips to get you started. by Kaitlyn Raterman from the symphonic blog Too many of us leave conferences with a dim memory of faces and a pile of business cards from people we don’t remember. You […]]]>

Building a network by making lasting connections lost is the backbone of the music industry. Here are some helpful tips to get you started.

by Kaitlyn Raterman from the symphonic blog

Too many of us leave conferences with a dim memory of faces and a pile of business cards from people we don’t remember. You swarm the marquee panelists with thirty other enthusiastic hopefuls, confidently approach the speakers, but maybe they won’t accept your card and act completely disinterested in what you say. You meet countless participants, exchange cards and random jokes that you barely remember. You’ve followed every person on the cards…but you’re getting little to no response. The conference proceeds as if it had never taken place. Life goes on. Why did you spend that several hundred dollar bill anyway?

Sound familiar? Imagine that instead…

The Art of Networking in the Music Industry

At the end of any conference, rather than leaving with social exhaustion and a stack of business cards from people you barely remember, you should ideally walk out of the building with 15 new laughing friends as you walk to the bar. You know their hometowns, their opinions on the latest [insert hot artist] album, and you know this is just the beginning of a long, beautiful and mutually beneficial relationship. (And you should always have the business cards of the people you remember in your bag.)

Maybe that pushes it, but I hope you get the point. Too many people approach conferences from a business perspective. Networking is not about forcibly selling yourself to strangers. It’s not about finding people who can help you. Networking is about building meaningful relationships with people.The relationships you build are more likely to result in a label/publishing deal, a new business partner, etc. than the 100 business cards you collected. CLICK TO TWEETER

Dress to impress and stand out.

When you dress impeccably, you’ll feel like you own the room, which often means you actually own the room. First impressions are everything. You can bump into an industry professional that really matters and first impressions can make or break a situation.

Appearance is one thing, but dressing up your business cards and marketing/promotional materials is also absolutely essential. Invest in customizing USB flash drives with your artist or band’s logo/name. There are several companies that exist to help with this. Make sure that in the content you include a PDF with a biography, a nice and concise note, links and information on how to contact you.

Do not be afraid. Approach strangers.

It sounds harsh and/or cliché, but one day we’re all going to die and it won’t matter what you did at this conference. What will matter is if you befriended the person who eventually introduced you to the person who got you a record deal that launched your prolific music career, which in turn inspired the world to give you a funeral like Michael Jackson.

Don’t be afraid to approach people you don’t know. Most importantly, don’t be hit by people you consider more “important” than you.

We are all human.

Be their friend, not a salesman.

Get to know people on a personal level before you even try to sell anything. Smile. Relax. Take a genuine interest in the person and what they are saying. Make sure your brain is wired to ingest lots of information – name, where they’re based, what company they’re with, their profession, favorite band, and more.

If after a conversation you feel the need to write a quick summary of the person on the card, take a bathroom break and do it. You will thank yourself later.

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Learn more…

Top 5 registration tools for your next event

Marketing strategies you should know as a musician

6 types of label contracts

How to do an income completeness check

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Focus on the person.

When introducing yourself, don’t start with a sales pitch or a long, wordy speech about yourself, your job, your life, you, you, you. Ask the other person questions. Focus on the person you are talking to. Really, really listen. Make him feel important. Then let the person ask you what you are doing.

Remember Tom Chiarella’s memoir in Esquire on the practice of courtesy: “When you travel the world, forget your business cards. Look no further for contacts. Instead, observe. Say hello to the people you see every day, but don’t make a fetish out of it. Stay interested in others. It bears repeating: Look around you. Remember the names. Remember where people were born.

Call them by their first name. Many times.

In the words of sage Dale Carnegie, “Remember that a person’s name is, to that person, the sweetest and most important sound in any language.” Repeat it once in your conversation and always say goodbye by calling the person by name.

Most importantly, don’t let yourself forget the name immediately so you have to ask the person, “What’s your name again?” So many faces today! It doesn’t make them feel important. You will impress them if you are the one who remembers.

Don’t push someone away immediately.

If you approach someone who doesn’t seem to be of much use to you right now, don’t push them away immediately. Evolution comes into play; you may be able to use its services in the future. Someone you know may be interested in these services.

Know when to sue.

If you and someone are getting along, hang around and talk for a while. Do not rush to meet the next contact. If you already feel like best friends, get the person’s number and invite them to meet you for coffee after the next panel. Foster a better relationship with the people you click with immediately.

Know your limits. Be bold, but courteous.

Conferences usually have hangout areas for networking, and meetings are often held in the same area. Be bold, but don’t approach a clearly enclosed group of people. Observe the setting, sitting position and body language. If these indicate an organized meeting between two or more people, stay away.

There’s a fine line between confidently approaching a group casually mingling in conversation and rudely interrupting a clearly private meeting.

Make friends with people of your level. Don’t put all your energy into stalking to establish hot-shots.

Befriend people on your level – start-ups, assistants, fellow composers/songwriters, up-and-coming bands, etc. and hang on. Eventually, one of you will be a VP/VIP. Then you will all be directors, vice-presidents, VIPs – you understand my drift – who can help each other.

So, when at a conference, don’t put all your energy into seeking out established and renowned staff. Divide your time wisely. Take the time to nurture personal connections with your peers and colleagues, as they will be with you for a long time.

Master the art of tracking.

It is essential to make good use of the time and money you have spent on this conference. Connect with them on LinkedIn. If you consider yourself friends with anyone you meet, especially around your age, don’t be afraid to befriend them on Facebook or Instagram.

In your follow-up email, don’t contact anyone unless you really feel that both of you could benefit each other in some way, now or in the future. If you don’t ask for something very specific in your email, the person won’t know what to do with the email, especially if it was sent to their work email, and will delete it. Send them an email with a purpose – maybe with something to consume, like a Dropbox link to 3 of your best tracks.

And of course, don’t turn your email into a novel. Be concise and relevant. If you get on well with the person, maybe pick up the phone and call. That’s more of a statement.

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Roundhay teenager who founded marketing agency Chillspot Music working with American artists from his bedroom in Leeds https://mp3ar.com/roundhay-teenager-who-founded-marketing-agency-chillspot-music-working-with-american-artists-from-his-bedroom-in-leeds/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 16:37:12 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/roundhay-teenager-who-founded-marketing-agency-chillspot-music-working-with-american-artists-from-his-bedroom-in-leeds/ However, Chase Morman showed his business acumen early on and started working on Chillspot Music at “13 or 14”. Now 19, he helps artists across the pond in the United States of America grow their audience and reach new ears with their music. “I was living in Manchester with my mum and needed some pocket […]]]>

However, Chase Morman showed his business acumen early on and started working on Chillspot Music at “13 or 14”. Now 19, he helps artists across the pond in the United States of America grow their audience and reach new ears with their music.

“I was living in Manchester with my mum and needed some pocket money,” he said. I really grew from there and turned it into something more official, more than myself. I was about 13 or 14, so I’ve been running it for about five years now.

Among the artists he has worked with is Atari Jones, a rapper from Cleveland who once collaborated with global star The Weeknd. “We help new artists or aspiring musicians find their footing,” he explained. “It’s pretty hard to get noticed on social media these days. We help them find suitable people for their music. We are more suited to new artists and we try to help them on their journey.”

The Covid-19 pandemic has presented a significant challenge for the music industry, but due to the online nature of Chase’s business, Chillspot Music has not been particularly affected. Image: Jonathan Gawthorpe

Chase insists there are obstacles to running a business as a teenager, but wants to see more young people take up the challenge of being an entrepreneur. “When I was much younger, I tried to hide the fact that the business was owned by a teenager,” he said. “I always thought it would really impact people’s opinions and it did for some people. Some people would see that and not want to go with the company, but now I’ve learned to really embrace it and let the company speak for itself.

“I think that’s a good thing, but it’s hard, especially networking with other CEOs and entrepreneurs. You’re judged pretty quickly on experience, but I have a lot of experience in starting a business. It’s a good thing because there are not enough young entrepreneurs, I always push the message that you have to do what you want. Try, there is not much to loose.

The Covid-19 pandemic has presented a significant challenge for the music industry, but due to the online nature of Chase’s business, Chillspot Music has not been particularly affected. “The online aspect of the music industry was booming during Covid, we had massive growth because obviously everyone was online and that’s our market,” he said. “We helped artists adapt to a changing market.”

Chase uses a variety of strategies to help introduce artists to people who could potentially be die-hard fans. “We have quite a large following on Twitter because that’s the platform we started on,” he said. “We do bespoke pay-per-click campaigns and ads on Facebook, Instagram and other social media channels.

Among the artists he has worked with is Atari Jones, a rapper from Cleveland who once collaborated with global star The Weeknd. Image: Jonathan Gawthorpe

“We have a set budget for a certain artist if they want to reach people who are interested in independent artists, we will set up a campaign for them and sort them out. I just want to scale it as much as possible. I want to grow, I let it go through its growth phase and then I see where we are.

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Spotify Talks Africa brings together stakeholders to discuss the African music industry https://mp3ar.com/spotify-talks-africa-brings-together-stakeholders-to-discuss-the-african-music-industry/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 20:26:22 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/spotify-talks-africa-brings-together-stakeholders-to-discuss-the-african-music-industry/ Spotify has launched Spotify Talks Africa, a video series that brings together the continent’s music industry players in conversation. The African music industry has grown by leaps and bounds over the past few years due to various factors including collaborations with local and international artists, music streaming and social media. However, only a small number […]]]>

Spotify has launched Spotify Talks Africa, a video series that brings together the continent’s music industry players in conversation. The African music industry has grown by leaps and bounds over the past few years due to various factors including collaborations with local and international artists, music streaming and social media. However, only a small number of artists are enjoying this success, and many talented creators are still struggling to break through.

The new video series is a forum for featured panelists to discuss these issues, as well as the solutions needed to ensure creative success.

At the heart of this is how music streaming platforms like Spotify can contribute to this growth. Panelists are drawn from across the industry and include artists, producers, artist managers and Spotify Sub-Saharan Africa team members who provide insight into the role of streaming in the industry.

Scheduled to be released quarterly, each video episode is themed around specific industry issues, ranging from how music streaming keeps legacy acts alive to the lived experiences of women in music.

The first episode is hosted by Kenyan media personality Mariam Bishar in conversation with John Katana Harrison, the frontman of legendary band Them Mushrooms; Wangechi, a Kenyan rapper who just returned from a three-year hiatus; and Monica Kemoli-Savanne, Spotify’s Artist and Label Partnerships Manager for East Africa. Their in-depth discussion covers exporting music to new audiences, music royalties, the tools needed to grow as an artist, and the role technology plays in it all.

Speaking on how streaming has changed the music industry, John Katana Harrison says, “I think it’s a good thing, we’re surprised now where people are listening to our music. It’s a new avenue where music can be taken anywhere in the country and beyond.

“That’s why you do collaborations, because then you reach the artist’s fan base,” Wangechi explains of the importance of collaborations.

“I encourage artists to tap into their backend through Spotify for Artists and build their strategies around that data. You can see the demographics of who listens to your music from age to gender and location,” adds Monica .

The industry is poised for even more growth and if Them Mushrooms is anything to go by, relevance and longevity can go hand in hand. Them Mushrooms’ participation in Spotify Talks is part of a series of activities organized by Spotify to celebrate the group’s 50th anniversary.

To watch the full conversation, go to spotifytalksafrica.byspotify.com.

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Salt-N-Pepa Salutes Music Industry’s ‘Strong Women’ at Walk of Fame Star Ceremony https://mp3ar.com/salt-n-pepa-salutes-music-industrys-strong-women-at-walk-of-fame-star-ceremony/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:55:23 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/salt-n-pepa-salutes-music-industrys-strong-women-at-walk-of-fame-star-ceremony/ S alt-N-Pepa praised the “strong women” who came before them in the music industry as they were honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The all-female rap trio shed light on those who had “endured misogyny…but somehow found a way to persevere” in a male-dominated field at the ceremony in Los Angeles […]]]>
S

alt-N-Pepa praised the “strong women” who came before them in the music industry as they were honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The all-female rap trio shed light on those who had “endured misogyny…but somehow found a way to persevere” in a male-dominated field at the ceremony in Los Angeles on Thursday.

Known as the first ladies of hip-hop, Salt-N-Pepa are considered pioneers of the genre, bringing fun, fashion and femininity to hip-hop.

The group consists of Cheryl “Salt” James, Sandra “Pepa” Denton and Deidra “DJ Spinderella” Roper.

They had major success in the 1990s with their album Very Necessary, which had two top five hits, Shoop and Whatta Man, and went five times platinum.

But it was the track None Of Your Business that won them the Grammy for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group in 1995.

Salt-N-Pepa was joined by fellow rappers MC Lyte and Roxanne Shante, who spoke ahead of the presentation.

In the first of three separate speeches, Salt said: “Obviously I can’t thank everyone because there are too many people who have contributed to our career, from the women who have come before us…to our peers and all the strong women who have been so supportive in this industry.

“Women who have endured misogyny in this industry but somehow find a way to persevere, but the women behind the scenes who never shine, the women who are overlooked and underappreciated, keep pushing.”

Pepa added that she was “at a loss for words” and the moment was “bittersweet” as her late father was not there to see the success he inspired.

“He was like, you have to be strong, you have to surpass in life, be accomplished. And so when he passed away, that’s all I could think of,” she said.

She added: “You know, with the fight for a woman in a male-dominated field to this day…we stay true, we stay focused on what you can do.

“It went against all odds, against all the trials and tribulations, turbulence, and that’s what it is, you stay focused on the high score, keep going.”

DJ Spinderella said Salt-N-Pepa’s music was “a movement felt globally”.

“Women everywhere have been forever inspired, changed by the message of strength and independence,” she said.

“And what this message has done for you, it has also done for me.”

Salt-N-Pepa met while a student at Queensborough Community College in Bayside, Queens, New York, where they created a diss track that became a local hit.

Soon after, DJ Spinderella joined the duo as the official DJ.

Raised in Brooklyn, New York and only 16 at the time, Spinderella is considered hip-hop’s most famous female DJ.

Among their many accomplishments, the group became the first female rap group to go gold and then platinum.

They became, along with Queen Latifah, the first female MCs to win a Grammy and became international superstars, taking hip-hop from Russia to Australia.

1993’s album Very Necessary is still the best-selling album of all time by any female rap artist.

Their star is the 2,738th on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and is awarded in the recording category.

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Yusuf/Cat Stevens signs with WME; Concord gets a new logo design https://mp3ar.com/yusuf-cat-stevens-signs-with-wme-concord-gets-a-new-logo-design/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 00:25:19 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/yusuf-cat-stevens-signs-with-wme-concord-gets-a-new-logo-design/ WME signed Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Yusuf/Cat Stevens for representation in all areas. The British singer-songwriter is currently working on a new album, as well as various other projects, including an autobiography and an upcoming world tour in 2023. Over the past two years, Yusuf has reworked and re-released several of his previous […]]]>

WME signed Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Yusuf/Cat Stevens for representation in all areas. The British singer-songwriter is currently working on a new album, as well as various other projects, including an autobiography and an upcoming world tour in 2023.

Over the past two years, Yusuf has reworked and re-released several of his previous projects in honor of their 50th anniversary. He completely re-recorded “Tea for the Tillerman as Tea for the Tillerman2” and released a box set to celebrate the debut of the original 1970 album. Additionally, 50th anniversary box sets of “Mona Bone Jakon” and “Teaser and the Firecat” will be followed by a new remastered anniversary edition of his 1972 album, “Catch Bull at Four”, slated for release in December.

Last year, his children’s book “Yusuf’s Peace Train” became a New York Times bestseller, and it was featured in the Apple TV+ documentary, “1971: The Year Music Changed Everything.” studying the link between music and important social relationships. and cultural reform.

+ Following the opening of ConcordeWorld headquarters in Nashville, the US-based rights company has changed its name with a new logo.

Concord’s new headquarters were built in 2020 and 2021 and officially opened earlier this year. The new space includes an 8,300 square foot expansion of its 2nd floor offices at Peabody Plaza. The 50,000 square foot LEED Silver-certified space in the Rolling Mill Hill neighborhood is nearly triple the size of Concord’s former offices at 1201 Demonbreun St.

“Concord has experienced significant growth over the past seven years, requiring new offices in Los Angeles, New York, Berlin and Nashville,” said Bob Valentine, Concord’s president. “Marrying not only copyrights, plays, musicals, recordings and other narrative content, but more importantly fusing the cultures of the many companies is what makes us the Concord of today.”

According to a statement, the move is part of Concord’s expansion plan to represent Concord’s artists, playwrights and composers “because none of them have sought the easy path to where they are.” ; instead, they aggressively challenged what might be. Concord’s new logo and identity is rooted in all of these things, with the artists as its mainstay.

Courtesy of Concord

+ Warner Records promoted Ron Stewart becomes Senior VP of urban promotion of the label and hired Cory Sparks as VP of urban promotion.

Based in New York, Stewart will expand his current role to lead promotion strategy and campaigns for all urban artists. He will report to Mike Chester, executive vice president of promotion and commerce. Sparks, who joins Warner after a decade at Epic Records, will be based in Atlanta, Georgia, and will report to Stewart.

Chester said: “Ron is one of the most respected and admired promotions executives in the business and all of our artists benefit from his musical insight and unparalleled expertise. And Cory has proven himself and been instrumental in breaking some of today’s biggest superstars. I look forward to working with them and the entire team to expand the reach of our multi-faceted promotional service.

Stewart came to Warner Records in 2019 and scored chart-topping singles from Saweetie, NLE Choppa, DVSN, Freddie Gibbs and more. He joined the label from Atlantic Records, where he was responsible for Northeast/Midwest regional promotion. Sparks was vice president of promotion at Epic Records, where he worked with Future, Travis Scott, DJ Khaled and Giveon.

+ Jessica Curtis joined Irving and The complete management of Jeffrey Azoffwhere she will work closely with manager Andy Mendelsohn on his longtime client Kings of Leon.

In her previous role as a consultant to Mendelsohn, New York-based Curtis helped launch a line of whiskey for Kings of Leon and the cast of “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and was instrumental in the beginnings of this last in the live recordings of his “Always Sunny Podcast”.

Previously, Curtis spent over seven years working under her father (Kelly Curtis) on the management team at Pearl Jam, where she served as Director of Marketing and Branding. She then oversaw new business and partnerships for creative agency Night After Night, including its subsidiary Spirits of the Night, which pairs famous artists with world-class spirits.

+ Milk & Honey Music + Sports announced the launch of an American Scholarship initiative beginning in February 2023. Successful applicants will be female writers and producers who will live, work and create in Los Angeles for two months with guaranteed access to the Milk & Honey roster and studio sessions.

The first match will be the Australian recipient Chelsea Warner with the producer/songwriter Felder Oak (Demi Lovato, Lizzo, Kehlani, Alicia Keys, John Legend) and Jenna Andrews (BTS, Noah Cyrus, David Guetta).

The scholarship was created by Lucas Keller, President and Founder of Mike & Honey, Milly Petriella, Managing Director of Milk & Honey Australasia, and Peter Coquillard, International Head.

In addition to Fleder and Andrews, eight-year-old Milk & Honey Music + Sports represents David Hodges, Sir Nolan, J. White Did It, Noah Goldstein Jamie Hartman, Andrés Torres and Mauricio Rengifo and has offices in Los Angeles, London, New York, Nashville and Dallas.

+ The chamber group hired Edwin Tetteh as a public relations officer; and promoted Shannon Atran as Deputy Director of Public Relations.

Tetteh will work with internal and external partners on exposure strategies for a wide range of clients, including Hulu’s “Iron Mike” series, Jon Batiste, Mariah Carey, National Black Theater and more. It will aim to “maximize the visibility of its clients on local, national and global media platforms in the theater, music, film, fashion and lifestyle sectors”, according to the official announcement. Tetteh, who is based in New York, will report directly to Chris Chambers, director/founder of The Chamber Group.

Atran will act as the exclusive independent director of public relations. She will be responsible for developing, executing and overseeing press campaigns, in addition to ensuring visibility for artists (Big Sean, TI, Zara Larsson, Dave East, Sevyn Streeter and others) across a wide range of media platforms. She will also lead the day-to-day implementation of client communications, including crisis response strategies and writing client statements. Based in New York, Atran will also report directly to Chambers.

+ Shoreline Fire Media promoted Chris Tailliewho was previously director of advertising, as vice president.

Taillie joined Shore Fire’s Brooklyn office in 2007 and has since been described as integral to Shore Fire’s growth by mentoring young employees and leading the company’s advertising campaigns. Her musical clients include Angélique Kidjo, Cyndi Lauper, Esperanza Spalding, Floating Points, Jacob Collier and Rhiannon Giddens, among others. He also played a key role in building Shore Fire’s music tech roster, working with live event e-commerce platform Lyte and OneOf, a leading web3 platform for music and lifestyle brands.

“Chris is a leader, tastemaker and trusted advisor at Shore Fire who has helped grow and define our roster in crucial ways,” says Matt Hanks, Senior Vice President. “With a clear vision and a steady hand, he guides his clients to rewards and accolades, and his teams to professional growth. We are so lucky to call him our colleague and we celebrate his elevation to Vice President.

+ Kayla J. Williams started his own public relations company: kj pr. After spending more than a decade at BECK Media and Giant Noise, the seasoned publicist will continue to work with clients in the entertainment and music industries.

According to Willimas, the name of the company comes from “a family nickname and what people from childhood still call me. When deciding what kind of business I wanted it to be, I wanted to pay homage to this weird kid who was playful and creative. This is the heart of kj pr.

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Blue: We had to learn to deal with a very different music industry – Music News https://mp3ar.com/blue-we-had-to-learn-to-deal-with-a-very-different-music-industry-music-news/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 10:05:35 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/blue-we-had-to-learn-to-deal-with-a-very-different-music-industry-music-news/ Blue is “still learning” how to navigate the modern music industry since returning. The boy band – made up of Duncan James, 44, Simon Webbe, 43, Antony Costa, 41 and Lee Ryan, 39 – topped the charts with hits such as “All Rise” and “One Love” at the early 2000s. but have now returned to […]]]>

Blue is “still learning” how to navigate the modern music industry since returning.

The boy band – made up of Duncan James, 44, Simon Webbe, 43, Antony Costa, 41 and Lee Ryan, 39 – topped the charts with hits such as “All Rise” and “One Love” at the early 2000s. but have now returned to music with their new album ‘Heart and Soul’ and Duncan explained that although he is “happy” to have had the experience of CDs, record store signings and television appearances, the group must now try to be “relevant” in a “very different” world of social media platforms and music streaming.

Duncan said: “It’s a very different industry now than it was then. Everything is very, very different with social media. But I’m really happy that we had the experiences that we had, like the TV shows that were around that we liked ‘Top of the Pops’, ‘CD:UK’ and ‘SM:TV’ I’m glad we had the Woolworths, store signings like that we have do and have climbed the ranks. It’s a very different world than what we’re used to but it’s about adapting and trying to be relevant in this new world. We just want the music to be about herself, we are all very proud of this album.”

Meanwhile, bandmate Antony added that he “doesn’t understand” the concept of streaming music on platforms like Spotify and Apple Music due to the disproportionate numbers compared to CD sales.

In the joint interview, he exclusively told BANG Showbiz, “It’s just that time has passed. We’re still learning, I’m still learning. Personally, I don’t get streams, I understand why he’s there. , but if I buy a single on a stream, I assume I helped and supported that artist, but you have to play it 10,000 times for it to count as a single sale I don’t understand, I don’t understand It’s not like the days of going to a record store, buying a CD and it counts as a sale. I still think about it and it still baffles me today!”

Blue’s new album ‘Heart and Soul’ is out and they are touring the UK in December.

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HODL the Line: The Future of Web3 in the Music Industry https://mp3ar.com/hodl-the-line-the-future-of-web3-in-the-music-industry/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 12:56:57 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/hodl-the-line-the-future-of-web3-in-the-music-industry/ In the following MBW Op/Ed, Gregor Pryor, Head of Entertainment and Media at Reed Smith Law Firm, explores the future of Web3 investment in the music industry using insights from the second edition of the his firm’s legal white paper, the Reed Smith Guide to the Metavers. The Web3 community’s continued interest in the music […]]]>

In the following MBW Op/Ed, Gregor Pryor, Head of Entertainment and Media at Reed Smith Law Firm, explores the future of Web3 investment in the music industry using insights from the second edition of the his firm’s legal white paper, the Reed Smith Guide to the Metavers.


The Web3 community’s continued interest in the music industry shows little sign of waning, and the love affair is starting to feel mutual.

Whether it’s Crypto.com signing a deal with Fantagio, MTV creating a virtual space in Roblox as part of a whole new awards category, or Muse’s new album, will of the peoplebeing released as a graphics-eligible NFT, it seems like we still only have our toes in the water of the vast pool of potential use cases for blockchain, metaverse, cryptocurrency, and decentralized organizations.

A few years ago, we learned more about Web3 and how it could influence the future of the music industry. We now know the answer to this question better. What everyone wants to know now – especially those who have spent huge capital on acquiring music rights – how big will it be?

Some commentators disagree on what Web3 is. Elon Musk thinks it’s “more marketing than reality”, while Jack Dorsey tweeted that the space will eventually be owned by VCs that don’t favor new business models.

Those who view Web3 dogmatically believe that this next wave of online technology has the potential to severely disrupt and disempower “big tech” companies, returning control to users and the Internet community.

It’s interesting, not least because the mainstream music industry has a love/hate relationship with big tech.

Some would say that the positive vibes come from the huge sums of money pumped into the industry, while the root of the negativity arguably stems from the rights holders’ lack of control over the distribution network. Does Web3 amplify or change these feelings?


So what do we mean by Web3?

The “Web1” era consisted of a network of static pages where the vast majority of users were consumers, not creators.

“Web2″, the version of the web we know today, is largely based on the idea of ​​”the web as a platform” and relies heavily on user-generated content (think YouTube, Meta and TikTok). Vast swathes of Internet properties are controlled by large “centralized” international entities; Web3 has the potential to be decentralized.

This means that ownership of assets, environments, communities, and even currencies can be split between builders and users. There are a number of other fundamental principles that guided the creation of Web3. For example, many apps are permissionless, with everyone having equal access to participate and no one being excluded. Web3 can also be “trustless”, meaning that it operates using incentives and economic mechanisms rather than relying on “trusted” third parties. Perhaps most powerfully, it has a native payment structure – cryptocurrency can be used to spend and send money online rather than relying on the outdated infrastructure of banks and payment processors.

The fundamental innovation that underpins Web3 is the blockchain. A blockchain is collectively stored and updated by all participants (each a “node”) on the network. Using cryptography, each block of transaction data is linked, forming a chain of records, making them secure and difficult to modify.

This technology also facilitates smart contracts. They are not contracts as lawyers generally describe them; rather, they are programs stored on a blockchain that run when predetermined conditions are met. In other words, if X happens, then Y happens. Blockchains underpin cryptocurrencies. They also underpin NFTs. Ownership of an NFT is recorded on a blockchain, and subsequent owners can be recorded each time the unique digital asset is bought and sold.


Web3 and the music industry

The potential of these technologies is vast – transferring control from centralized entities to builders and users can act as a democratizing influence on content consumption.

In the music industry, this can manifest itself in different ways. Some believe this potentially creates more sovereignty for artists and greater opportunities for engagement between fans and artists. Rather than relying on intermediaries, such as distributors, managers, digital streaming service providers, and accountants or lawyers, artists can interact and transact directly with their fans. Removing bundles of NFT content with exclusive recordings, digital artwork, and lifetime concert passes can be done with a click.

Others believe that Web3 can cause catastrophic damage to the digital models that have created enormous value for the industry, leading to increased copyright valuations and dramatic revenue growth for labels, publishers and PROs. .

Some believe that one of the innovations that could truly disrupt the industry is the token ownership of royalty streams. Web3 companies are exploring the possibility of tokenizing underlying copyright or royalty revenue streams and allowing fans to “invest” in new music in return for a split share of royalty revenue perceived when the music is exploited.


Business and legal challenges

Of course, with these technologies still at a nascent stage, there are a number of barriers to their widespread application. Accessibility is a key limitation, with transaction costs (known as ‘gas’) being prohibitive for many. Education is also needed to help consumers learn new mental models than they are used to with Web2. And, more importantly, the gold rush caused by speculation in cryptocurrencies has caused volatility and uncertainty for many. Granted, there’s a lot of crime in the world of Web3 – regulators and lawmakers are rushing to keep up with development.

This brings us to the legal challenges in this space. With huge sums at stake and confusion over the responsibilities and duties of different players, Web3 issues are the subject of much litigation. The world of Web3 is undeniably riddled with cybersecurity and fraud issues. This month alone, Solana, a public blockchain used by a number of Web3 music platforms, was hacked. Thousands of Solana wallets were attacked, estimated to be worth between $5 million and $10 million.

Music rights are inevitably discussed in the Web3 environment. Many artists will consider that they have the exclusive right to release their music as NFT, for example, while most record labels will take a somewhat different view.

Decentralized technologies challenge the way we traditionally protect intellectual property. Add in AI-generated music, for example, that further tests our existing copyright laws, and you have a heady mix. While traditional laws were developed to protect personal expression, authorship, and originality of human-created works, perhaps the metaverse offers a whole new format for creativity with a new distribution network.

Other concerns relate to the fluctuating value of cryptocurrency and the general public’s lack of understanding of the risks. For example, are NFTs legally considered investment products or securities? If so, anyone offering them will have to comply with strict financial regulations. It is clear that regulators view investing in crypto-assets as highly speculative and are watching this space carefully. Companies operating in Web3 should therefore ensure that they are aware of the changing regulatory landscape.

These problems are a reminder of the risks that are inextricably linked to the opportunities of Web3. While the potential is evident for the music industry, providing a welcome alternative to a big tech-dominated model, to realize this potential players – whether artists, streaming platforms or Web3 companies – must assess carefully approach them before diving in, avatar- headfirst.

The music industry around the world

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Select committee to learn more about the extent of bullying and harassment in the music industry https://mp3ar.com/select-committee-to-learn-more-about-the-extent-of-bullying-and-harassment-in-the-music-industry/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 09:05:49 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/select-committee-to-learn-more-about-the-extent-of-bullying-and-harassment-in-the-music-industry/ A nationwide inquiry that found widespread examples of bullying and harassment in the music industry will be discussed by a select government committee this week (Wednesday October 26). Almost 600 people working in a variety of roles in the wider UK music industry responded to the survey conducted by academics from the University of the […]]]>

A nationwide inquiry that found widespread examples of bullying and harassment in the music industry will be discussed by a select government committee this week (Wednesday October 26).

Almost 600 people working in a variety of roles in the wider UK music industry responded to the survey conducted by academics from the University of the West of Scotland and Northumbria University.

The results revealed that 96% of all respondents had been bullied and 81% had been harassed.

People with disabilities or who identified as being part of a sexual minority also reported significant levels of bullying, at 98% and 97% respectively.

85% of respondents said the bullying and harassment they had experienced had a negative impact on them, and more than half said the bully had influenced their career.

The findings of this report, along with a more in-depth analysis specific to the experiences of women in the industry, have been submitted as evidence and will be discussed as part of the Select Committee hearing on women and women. Equalities on Misogyny in Music, which will be held on Wednesday, October 26.

Dr Cassandra Jones and Dr Kallia Manoussaki co-led the study, which was funded by the Royal Society of Edinburgh, to compile this first evidence base on bullying and harassment experienced by people working as musicians, technical team, producers, promoters, managers and more.

Dr Manoussaki, a senior lecturer at the University of West Scotland, said: “Research has highlighted an urgent need for change in the music industry.

“These findings, along with quantitative data, underscore the urgency of the problem of bullying and harassment, including sexual harassment. There is a disproportionate prevalence among women and marginalized groups.

Dr Jones, a senior lecturer in criminology in the Department of Social Sciences at Northumbria University, will give oral testimony about this research and the experiences of women working in the music industry at the select committee hearing at the Palace of Westminster.

She said: “The MeToo movement has brought a toll for those who engage in abusive behavior in the workplace, but has made little inroad in the music industry, despite significant coverage of sexual predators.

“This research shows that there is an immediate need for an independent music industry body that will ensure organizations follow the laws, hold perpetrators accountable and protect all victims..”

The Misogyny in Music Survey was launched to examine what misogynistic attitudes exist in the music industry and how they can ripple through society, influencing attitudes and the treatment of women and girls at events live music.

The authors of the report encourage anyone working in the music industry to continue to share their views through confidential interviews. To enter, email Cassandra Jones or contact the researchers on Twitter.

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LES MIZ Gavroche-Based Musical Will Be Industry Read https://mp3ar.com/les-miz-gavroche-based-musical-will-be-industry-read/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 16:46:31 +0000 https://mp3ar.com/les-miz-gavroche-based-musical-will-be-industry-read/ Producer and Disney music veteran Mitchell Leib will present an invitation-only Equity presentation of Bonnie Gleicher’s new musical Gavroche (book, music and lyrics), directed by Catie Davis and conducted by Adam Laird on Thursday, October 20. GAVROCHE is a new take on Victor Hugo’s book Les Miserables with a pop and contemporary score, told from […]]]>

Producer and Disney music veteran Mitchell Leib will present an invitation-only Equity presentation of Bonnie Gleicher’s new musical Gavroche (book, music and lyrics), directed by Catie Davis and conducted by Adam Laird on Thursday, October 20.

GAVROCHE is a new take on Victor Hugo’s book Les Miserables with a pop and contemporary score, told from the perspective of rambling street urchin Gavroche Thénardier and his teenage sisters Eponine and Azelma. When a rebellion breaks out in Paris, they are thrown onto the cobbled streets in an urgent search for love, family and a new life.

Telsey + Co. GAVROCHE cast includes Kate Bailey (Broadway: Beetlejuice), Gerald Caesar (Broadway: Tina), Dwayne Harrison Clark, Natalie Charle Ellis (Broadway: Beetlejuice), Donnie Hammond (NY: Titanic), Kaylin Hedges (Hollywood Bowl : Annie), Devin Lewis (Broadway: Newsies The Musical), Benjamin Pajak (Broadway: The Music Man), Salena Qureshi (NYC: Superhero. Netflix’s “The Society”), Lance Roberts (Broadway: The Music Man), Jake Swain (Broadway: Mean Girls), Jayden Theophile (Broadway: The Lion King), Clyde Voce (Broadway: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) and Lee Zarrett (Broadway: Jane Eyre, My Fair Lady).

“Gavroche’s story has such significant parallels to our world today,” says Leib, former president of Disney Music & Soundtracks for more than 30 years. “I am proud to be part of the next stage of its evolution. I have been fortunate to have worked with many of Broadway’s greatest composers, including Alan Menken, Tim Rice, Stephen Schwartz, Pasek & Paul, Stephen Sondheim and Mark Shaiman to name a few. Now I’m adding Bonnie Gleicher to my list.

Over the past 18 months, amateur productions of Gavroche have been featured nationwide in top performing arts programs in California, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Florida and more.

BONNIE GLEICHER (book, music, lyrics, orchestrations) is a composer, playwright and arranger whose music has been heard on Broadway, TV and YouTube. Her theatrical career began as a child, performing on Broadway in Jane Eyre and Annie, and came full circle, writing musicals and pop for audiences of all ages. His songs have been sung by Liz Callaway, Taylor Louderman, Chuck and Lilli Cooper, Bonnie Milligan and many more. Bonnie is the songwriter/lyricist for the off-Broadway musical Addy & Uno, which was nominated for the Off-Broadway Alliance Award. Bonnie is also the composer, lyricist and arranger of Pocket.watch’s Hulu series MarMar Land, which has over 200 million views on YouTube. Out of over 500 submissions, Taylor Louderman chose Bonnie’s song “Love” to perform live at 54 Below for their Write Out Loud songwriting contest. “Love” has since been sung across Germany, Australia, the United States and Japan. Selena Gomez and Victoria’s Secret models danced to her song “I Want Tonight Forever”, chosen as the backstage theme song for the 2015 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show. In honor of Addy & Uno, Bonnie received a county proclamation of Westchester. Disability Office. She conducts masterclasses, earned a Phi Beta Kappa degree in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and studied at the BMI Musical Theater Workshop.

CATIE DAVIS (director) is a New York-based director who directs and develops contemporary musicals. His recent accomplishments include Then She Ran (Scranton Cultural Center), Missed:Connections (Manhattan School of Music), The Black Count (Broadway on Demand) and Empath (TheatreLab). She works as Associate Director on Broadway productions of Beetlejuice and Moulin Rouge. Other related works: Company (Broadway), Ben Platt Live from Radio City Music Hall (Netflix), The Public Theatre, Roundabout Theater Company, Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. She is a 2018 Manhattan Theater Club Directing Fellow, Lincoln Center Directors Lab alumnus, and proud member of the SDC. Catie has developed work with editorial teams Eli Kaplan-Wildmann, Yonatan Cnaan and Andrew Zachary Cohen; Kate Thomas and Joey Contreras; Vince Burwell and James Sasser, among others. She continues to seek new collaborations and opportunities for theater to bring communities together. @catie-davis catie-davis.com

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